Easter Sunday – April 20, 2014

April 16th, 2014

Acts 10:34a, 37-43

Colossians 3:1-4

John 20:1-9

When I was young, it was a tradition to get a new outfit for Easter-a spring dress, shiny new shoes and new ribbons for my sister’s hair (mine was always too short and too curly for ribbons.)  One of my favorite pictures of my Italian grandmother is on an Easter Sunday where she has her new dress and a new hat, standing on tiptoes with her high heel shoes so she would appear taller. We all wanted to look our best for Easter Sunday.

That’s an important aspect of Easter-the “newness” of life that comes to us because of Jesus’ death and resurrection.  Somehow though, we have equated newness with outward appearances of looking beautiful, impressive-even striving for perfection.  Lutheran pastor Nadia Bolz-Weber challenges this perspective:

“The God of Easter, the God who brings life out of death doesn’t want to make you impressive, this God isn’t satisfied with making you good or nice. If you think that’s what resurrection looks like, if you think it looks like perfection and piety and therefore you haven’t experienced it, you might be wrong. Because God isn’t about making you spiffy.  God isn’t about making you nicer.  God is about making you new.  And new doesn’t always look perfect, with a fabulous new dress because like the Easter story itself, new can be messy.

New looks like recovering alcoholics.

New looks like reconciliation between family members who don’t actually deserve it.

New looks like every time I manage to admit I was wrong and every time I manage to not mention when I’m right.

New looks like the lumpy awkward forgiveness we manage to scrounge up despite ourselves.

New looks like every fresh start and every act of forgiveness and every moment of letting go of what we thought we couldn’t live without and then somehow living without it anyway.

New is the thing you never saw coming …never even hoped for, but ends up being what you needed all along and it happens to all of us.

Because as Jesus said…the world according to God is near to us. And God simply keeps reaching down into the dirt of humanity and pulling us out of the graves we dig for ourselves through our violence, our lies, our selfishness, our arrogance and our addictions. And God keeps loving us back to life over and over.”

We certainly participate in this “new” life for our patients, residents and families in our Catholic health care ministry at St. Mary’s through our programs, services and individual patient encounters.  But hopefully you are experiencing this newness for yourselves in the times God is loving you back to life after disappointments, frustration, misunderstandings or other challenges.

Happy Easter! Happy New Life!

Elizabeth Keene

Mission Integration

Palm Sunday – April 13, 2014

April 11th, 2014

Isaiah 50: 4-7

Philippians 2:6-11

Matthew 26: 14-27;66

Imagine… it’s a warm sunny day in Jerusalem and people have heard that Jesus is coming to town. Crowds begin to form and there is talk of Jesus being the One. The One who will save them from oppression and persecution. Excitement is building as they hear that He is approaching. There is talk of the miracles He has performed. More people gather – some faithful followers, others out of curiosity. Then they see him and shouts of praise rise in the air. These ordinary people begin to lay their garments out in the dirt street forming a “red carpet” for Jesus. People are shouting: “Blessed is the King who comes in the name of the Lord. Peace in heaven and glory in the highest!” (Lk 19:38). In his homily on Youth Day 2013, Pope Francis said, “Jesus has awakened great hopes, especially in the hearts of the simple, the humble, the poor, the forgotten, those who do not matter in the eyes of the world. He understands human sufferings, he has shown the face of God’s mercy, and He has bent down to heal body and soul.” These are the very people who were welcoming Jesus. The joy expressed on this day came from hope that Jesus would be the king who would save them from oppression, misery, and tyranny.

As this scene continued to unfold, Jesus understood that he was entering this city for the last time. While many had come to know Jesus, others still misunderstood his real purpose for being here and mistrusted Him and his message. Simply, Jesus had come to assure us of His Father’s love and to bring us salvation from our sins.  He came to teach them, to teach us how to live: to love the Lord your God with your whole heart your whole soul, your whole being and to love your neighbor as yourself. So simple a message and yet it was mired by jealousy, mistrust, and hatred. The manner in which He entered Jerusalem showed us that he was not a king above the people but of the people. He was one of them. He understood them. He loved them so much that he was riding toward Calvary to sacrifice his life for the atonement of sins committed in the past, present, and future. So while there was great joy on this day, Jesus also experienced a heaviness of heart.

Let us remember His sacrifice as we wave our palms this Sunday and make sincere resolutions to lead better lives. As we listen to people’s stories of brokenness, let us bring the hope of the crucifixion and the resurrection of Jesus to all the people we encounter here at St. Mary’s Health System and in the world. May God bless you all as we begin Holy Week.

 

Dan Doyon

Pastoral Care

 

 

Fifth Sunday of Lent – April 6, 2014

April 11th, 2014

First Reading: Ezekiel 37:12-14
Second Reading: Romans 8:8-11
Gospel: John 11:1-45

Today’s Gospel shows Jesus not as some distant spiritual icon, but as someone we can relate to. We see him weeping at the tomb of his friend Lazarus. And that is beautiful to contemplate.
We tend to forget that Jesus was human. We tend to forget that Jesus had feelings like us. We tend to forget that he felt tired, hungry, and thirsty.

Why is it so important that we remember these facts?

Why is it so important that we notice the tears flowing down his cheeks at the tomb? It’s because this is a dimension of Jesus that we can all identify with.

Because Jesus had feelings, because he got tired, hungry, and thirsty, he knows exactly how we feel at times. And this is important if we are to identify with Jesus and relate to him. Because he had feelings, he understands what it’s like to be human. And just knowing this makes all the difference in the world.

Today’s Gospel shows us not only a Jesus who inspires us by his humanity, but also a Jesus who transfers us by his divinity. We not only see him weep at the tomb of Lazarus, but we also see him raise Lazarus to life. It shows us a Jesus who can touch our lives in a way that no other human can do. An example will help us illustrate.

Thomas Merton was a great modern spiritual leader. His life story reads like a movie script. He was orphaned at 16, became a Communist at 20, found Jesus at 23, became a Catholic at 24, and entered a Trappist Monastery at 26.

He was in his late teens backpacking his way through Europe when he began his spiritual journey. It started when he started visiting the great cathedrals. He was overwhelmed by their art.
In his spiritual autobiography, “The Seven Story Mountain”, Merton writes:

“And now for the first time in my life, I began to find out something of Who this Person was that men called Christ.
The (artists) of those forgotten days had left upon the walk of their churches (paintings), Which by the peculiar grace of God, I was able to in some measure to apprehend… But above all the most real and most immediate source of this grace was Christ, himself, teaching me who he was.”

So, because Jesus was a Son of Man, he could inspire young Merton. And because he was also the Son of God, he could do infinitely more. He could also transform him beyond his wildest dream.

Now, in regard to each of us, the Gospel’s story of Lazarus, and the life story of Thomas Merton speaks to us about Jesus in a way that we can understand and relate to. And what do they tell us?
First, they tell us that Jesus is the Son of Man. He was like us in all things but sin. He understands what it is like to be tempted and rejected, and hurt. Second, the stories tell us he is not only a Son of Man, but also the Son of God.

He can do for us what no other person on earth could ever do. He can raise us to new life and transform us, as he did Lazarus.

This is the Good News contained in today’s reading.

It is the Good News that Jesus is both Son of Man and Son of God.

It is the Good News that Jesus knows us better than we know ourselves.

It is the Good News that if we open our hearts to Jesus, he will show us life as we’ve never seen it before.

Will you open your hear to Jesus this Lent in a New Way?

Rev. Joseph Manship
Pastoral Care

First Sunday of Lent – March 8, 2014

March 4th, 2014

Genesis 2:7-9; 3:1-7

Romans 5: 12-19

Matthew 4:1-11

 

The readings this weekend provide us with an opportunity to look at temptation, sin, and redemption. These are themes we will see repeated throughout the Lenten season culminating with Easter. In the first reading from Genesis, the idea of temptation and sin are presented. Eve and Adam succumb to temptation by the serpent and they commit an act of disobedience against God. This one act had repercussions for years to come. In the Gospel reading, Jesus is tempted by the Satan while in the desert. Satan tries to have Jesus bow down to him in return for false promises of power, safety, and food. Jesus resists the temptations and admonishes Satan. These are two very different scenarios. In one, Adam and Eve fall from grace and in the other, Jesus receives grace.

We are faced with temptation every day. Temptation comes in many forms. It may come through the media, friends, co-workers, strangers, or even within our own minds and hearts. Temptation comes from anything or anyone that tries to pull us away from our relationship with God or prevents us from beginning one.

The season of Lent provides us with time to look at sin in our personal lives. Where have we failed to love God, those around us and ourselves? What are the things that prevent us from having a relationship with God or tear us away from that relationship we already had with Him? Do we play the blame game or do we look at what part we played in sinful moments?

In the second reading from the Letter of Saint Paul we are offered hope. It is written, “For if by the transgression (sin) of the one, the many died, how much more did the grace of God and the gracious gift of one the man Jesus Christ overflow for the many. And the gift is not like the result of the one who sinned. For after one sin there was the judgment that brought condemnation; but the gift (Jesus), after many transgressions, brought acquittal.” In this reading, we are being reminded that because of the selfless act of love by Jesus, He brought acquittal for our past transgressions. However, did that stop us who have free will from sinning again? The obvious answer is No.

 

We find ourselves at the threshold of a new Lenten season during which time we are called to take a long look at ourselves and our relationship with God. Spend time in reflection, pray, fast, and do good deeds for others as a means of entering or fostering a deeper relationship with God. As we embark on our Lenten journeys, may we continue to serve those in need around us here at St. Mary’s Health System and in our families.  May God bless us all.

Dan Doyon

Pastoral Care

 

Eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time – March 2, 2014

February 26th, 2014

Isaiah 49:14-15

1 Corinthians 4:1-5

Matthew 6:24-34

 

The first reading from Isaiah is brief but is one of the most loving and tender messages we can find in the Bible.  Like us sometimes, Israel was lamenting, feeling forsaken and forgotten by God. The second verse is one of great comfort. God responds with real tenderness offering a powerful metaphor.  “Can a mother forget her infant, be without tenderness for the child of her womb?”  Likewise God says: “Even should she forget, I will never forget you.”  When we are feeling down and out and wonder if anyone cares about us, let us remember this wonderful verse.  God indeed loves us with great tenderness very much like a mother loves her infant. This feminine metaphor was quite unusual in this male-centered society.  God has a love for his people similar to that of a mother.   This indicates that God has a feminine dimension, feminine characteristics. It speaks of a close intimacy between God and God’s people.

The second reading from 1 Corinthians encourages us to be trustworthy in all that we do for others. This means to do the best we can in truth and in sincerity, to work and serve others wholeheartedly. I may judge myself, or others may judge me, but no matter. God is my judge; God knows my heart and its every motive and will shed light on what is hidden in the darkness at my final judgment. This passage could remind us also not to judge others.  Surely we do not know the motives of their heart or how their mind understands things. Having God as my judge can be demanding but it can also be consoling and reassuring because God knows my heart…

In the Gospel we hear Jesus say we cannot serve two masters.  Our commitment to God must come first.  For many people what might rival that commitment is wealth, wanting more money and more things. Possessions in themselves are not bad, but inordinate attachment to them is harmful. Living with constant greed in our heart and in our mind is not spiritually or emotionally healthy. It is a form of idolatry.

Jesus reminds us not to worry about food, clothing and shelter. (Easier said than done!) Jesus is not naïve however. He knows people need these things to survive and to function. We need to work, earn and give our families what they need. What Jesus is asking is that we not obsess about these things and not live in constant anxiety. Again, Jesus supplies us with a metaphor, an image of the birds of the air, the flowers of the field.  God provides for them.  Jesus is not suggesting passivity or laziness.  But he is asking us to trust and to have confidence in God’s Providence as we toil for what is needed and as we do our best. (As an aside, I often share a saying, not from Scripture, but from a Salada Tea Bag: “Worrying is like being in a rocking chair.  It keeps you busy but gets you nowhere.” ) Worrying is really a waste of time and actually can wear us out.

In summary these Scripture readings point to God’s trustworthiness. God is there for us at all times, with tenderness, concern, love and forgiveness. We can count on it because of the bond between God our Father/Mother and the beloved children we are.  This bond is the basis of our trust and Jesus is the basis of our hope.

As members of St. Mary’s Health System, may we witness to that trustworthiness of God by being trustworthy in all that we do in service to our patients, residents and colleagues. If our whole attitude and demeanor demonstrate competency, kindness and confidence, we will call forth trust in those we serve.

 

Sr.Suzanne Beaudoin, SSCh,  Director of Pastoral Care

Eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time – March 2, 2014

February 25th, 2014

Isaiah 49:14-15
1 Corinthians 4:1-5
Matthew 6:24-34

The first reading from Isaiah is brief but is one of the most loving and tender messages we can find in the Bible. Like us sometimes, Israel was lamenting, feeling forsaken and forgotten by God. The second verse is one of great comfort. God responds with real tenderness offering a powerful metaphor. “Can a mother forget her infant, be without tenderness for the child of her womb?” Likewise God says: “Even should she forget, I will never forget you.” When we are feeling down and out and wonder if anyone cares about us, let us remember this wonderful verse. God indeed loves us with great tenderness very much like a mother loves her infant. This feminine metaphor was quite unusual in this male-centered society. God has a love for his people similar to that of a mother. This indicates that God has a feminine dimension, feminine characteristics. It speaks of a close intimacy between God and God’s people.

The second reading from 1 Corinthians encourages us to be trustworthy in all that we do for others. This means to do the best we can in truth and in sincerity, to work and serve others wholeheartedly. I may judge myself, or others may judge me, but no matter. God is my judge; God knows my heart and it’s every motive and will shed light on what is hidden in the darkness at my final judgment. This passage could remind us also not to judge others. Surely we do not know the motives of their heart or how their mind understands things. Having God as my judge can be demanding but it can also be consoling and reassuring because God knows my heart…

In the Gospel we hear Jesus say we cannot serve two masters. Our commitment to God must come first. For many people what might rival that commitment is wealth, wanting more money and more things. Possessions in themselves are not bad, but inordinate attachment to them is harmful. Living with constant greed in our heart and in our mind is not spiritually or emotionally healthy. It is a form of idolatry.

Jesus reminds us not to worry about food, clothing and shelter. (Easier said than done!) Jesus is not naïve however. He knows people need these things to survive and to function. We need to work, earn and give our families what they need. What Jesus is asking is that we not obsess about these things and not live in constant anxiety. Again, Jesus supplies us with a metaphor, an image of the birds of the air, the flowers of the field. God provides for them. Jesus is not suggesting passivity or laziness. But he is asking us to trust and to have confidence in God’s Providence as we toil for what is needed and as we do our best. (As an aside, I often share a saying, not from Scripture, but from a Salada Tea Bag: “Worrying is like being in a rocking chair. It keeps you busy but gets you nowhere.” ). Worrying is really a waste of time and actually can wear us out.

In summary, these Scripture readings point to God’s trustworthiness. God is there for us at all times, with tenderness, concern, love and forgiveness. We can count on it because of the bond between God our Father/Mother and the beloved children we are. This bond is the basis of our trust and Jesus is the basis of our hope.
As members of St. Mary’s Health System, may we witness to that trustworthiness of God by being trustworthy in all that we do in service to our patients, residents, and colleagues. If our whole attitude and demeanor demonstrate competency, kindness and confidence, we will call forth trust in those we serve.
Sr. Suzanne Beaudoin, SSCh,
Director of Pastoral Care

Seventh Sunday in Ordinary Time – February 23, 2014

February 18th, 2014

Psalm 13 (12):6

Leviticus 19:1-2, 17-18

Corinthians 3:16-23

Matthew 6:24

 

            Then every man, of every clime,

That prays in his distress.

Prays to the human form divine,

Love, Mercy, Pity, Peace.

And all must love the human form,

In heathen, Turk or Jew;

Where Mercy, Love, and Pity dwell

There God is dwelling too.

                                              William Blake

 

Good day my friends and fellow caregivers here at St. Mary’s Regional Medical Center and d’Youville Pavilion.  The poet William Blake has beautifully summarized the Old and New Testament readings/lessons for today in his poem Divine Imaging.  Blake reminds us that we each are created in the image of God and therefore, we must see that image in everyone we encounter.

 

The Psalmist in Song 13 in the Old Testament asks God to:  “Give light to mine eyes so that I may recognize my enemies and not allow them to prevail over me…”

 

Reading from the book of Leviticus, we have another reminder of God’s desire for the way we should live.  “You shall not bear hatred for anyone in your heart.  Though you may have to reprove or correct your neighbor, do not incur sin on account of him or her.  Take no revenge and bear no grudge against any person.  You shall love your neighbor as you love yourself.”     

 

From Saint Paul who spent so many years running from the Lord and then “eating humble pie”,

In a letter to the people of Corinth, Paul rebukes them, “Are you not aware that you are the temple of God and that the Spirit of God dwells in you?  If anyone destroys God’s temple, God will destroy him. For, the temple of God is holy and you are that temple.”

 

Our Gospel reading continues the theme of the lessons this week:  God in his infinite love for us took on our likeness and was born as a boy child among us.  Matthew is the one of the four gospel writers considered “the teacher.”  Learning (teaching) and healing are the ways Jesus makes the “good news” and the kingdom of God known in our gospels. And, so it is that we turn to Luke as “the one to heal” and to Matthew as “the one to teach.”  Church history indicates that Matthew’s hand is the one the church reached out to first as soon as there were stories of Jesus’ work.

 

“My command to you is: love your enemies, pray for your persecutors.

This will prove you are sons and daughters of your heavenly Father.

His sun rises on the bad and the good.  His rain falls on the just and the unjust.

If you only love those who love you, what merit is there in that?”

Go for the Gold! Love, God

                                                                                  

Blessings and Thanks for your work!
Elizabeth Lowe BCC

Pastoral Care

February 12th, 2014

First Reading:  Sirach 15:15-30

Second Reading:  1 Corinthians 2:6-10

Gospel:  Matt 5:17-57

When we are honest with ourselves, we are probably more like the scribes and Pharisees of Jesus’ time than we sometimes like to admit.  What I mean is that we tend to follow the law as far as fulfilling what exactly the law requires.

One easy example is many cities today have erected speed and red light cameras at critical intersections that have caused serious accidents in the past.  The law gives us a speed limit and asks us to stop when the light is yellow or red.  The reason for this law is to save lives and keep people from injuries.  Yet, so many of us disregard the law.  We step on the gas when the light turns yellow and regularly exceed speed limits.  But, when we know these cameras are at intersections, we slow down and stop when we might stomp on the gas.  Sure, we keep the law.  But, our heart is not into it.  Our wallet is.

Today’s Gospel is a continuation of Jesus’s Sermon the Mount.  This Sermon is a blueprint for living faithfully as a Christian.  Jesus speaks about laws and human behavior.  Jesus certainly does not make his hearer’s lives easier by easing the law a little.  So, what does he do?  He gives a “Better” reason for keeping it than simply enumerating the consequences of breaking the laws.  He calls us to deepen our relationships with those around us.  He calls this “right relationship”.  So, we see He has not come to abolish the law; he has come to show us what its fulfillment looks like.

What does it mean for Jesus to fulfill the law?  The law is a way of saying not to our selfish inclinations.  It is like practicing dying to ourselves for the common good.  Jesus sees in the law the means to the fulfillment of time (“that all things have taken place”).  This means that the law will be replaced by right relationships where we live within the will of God.

The fundamental law is the gift of self to others.  When self-giving is lacking in any act of keeping the law, the real law in fact is not kept.  We are to keep the law as the way of practicing care for and relating to others’ this leads to the fullness of life.  Our model for doing so is Jesus.

It means that we look at the root of our anger with others and I would like to offer four practical ways that we may practice integrating and going beyond the letter of the law or minimizing the law.  First, we don’t say a perfunctory, “I’m sorry” when we’ve hurt another, but mean it from our heart and strive to do whatever we can to restore the rupture in the relationship.

Second, we look at the root of the anger with others and perhaps then discover what needs to change in us.

Third, when we are unfaithful in our relationship, we question whether we are demanding too much of others, whether our own selfishness is getting in the way of growing in our love for others.

Finally, we follow through on our commitments.

Whether we are talking about our personal relationship or our work, I believe the same reflective attitude is necessary if the true law of love is to be practiced faithfully.

The “righteousness” that Jesus asks of us is not concerned with “minimums” – even of keeping the law, but is concerned with caring for others as he did.  It means loving as he did.  Jesus lives the supreme act of love giving self totally.  To follow Jesus faithfully, we need to develop a daily habit of giving self to others – for their good and for our own.  For a life habit of self-giving, love is the only way we “enter the kingdom of heaven”.

Rev. Joseph Manship

Pastoral Care

 

The Feast of the Baptism of the Lord

February 11th, 2014

Readings: Isaiah 42:1-4, 6-7, Acts 10:34-38, Matthew 3:13-17

The feast of the Baptism of the Lord marks the beginning of Jesus’ public ministry.  It is also one of the few times that God speaks directly in the New Testament.  Mark Allan Powell points out “there are only two texts in Matthew in which God actually speaks directly. One is read on the Baptism of the Lord, the first Sunday in the Epiphany season; the other is read on the Transfiguration of the Lord, the last Sunday in the Epiphany Season. These weeks we call Epiphany are literally framed by two divine pronouncements. What’s really interesting is that both times that God chooses to speak aloud from heaven, God says almost exactly the same thing: Jesus is God’s beloved Son and God is pleased with Jesus (3:17; 17:5).”  In other gospels, God speaks directly to Jesus saying, “You are my Son” but in Matthew’s gospel, it’s almost as if God is introducing Jesus to the world when he says, “This is my Son, my Beloved.”  Jesus’ identity is announced through this baptismal event.
Jesus remains true to this announcement throughout his life; it shapes his mission and his relationship with God and with his followers. As “beloved of God” he finds the strength to stand up to religious and political authorities, to challenge the status quo and even to remain faithful to his calling when he is crucified.
This is a very different message than many people hear today through the media, public policy or even for some, their families.  Instead people are labeled as throw-aways, useless, troublemakers, or “difficult.”  Children are sold into slavery for drug money, students are bullied, the elderly are neglected or abandoned, refugees are marginalized, enemies are tortured-all in stark contrast to the message God is giving, not just to Jesus, but to all of us: “You are beloved; you are my child.”
Respect is one of our core values and the readings for this weekend highlight the importance of treating people with respect.  In the second reading, Jesus is described as one who went about “doing good and healing those who are oppressed.”  That is our task as well: to lift up patients who are bowed down in sorrow or pain and wait for a kind word, a smile or a compassionate touch.  Or perhaps to help recognize a co-worker as one beloved of God and worthy of respect, forgiveness or a second chance.  We too can affirm people for their goodness and their inherent worth.  And hopefully we can recognize our own value and find strength to continue on our own journeys as well as “beloved of God.”

The feast of the Baptism of the Lord invites us to celebrate our identity as beloved children of God and reminds us that our healing mission is firmly rooted in the Spirit that anointed Jesus and inspired St. Marguerite d’Youville.

–Elizabeth Keene, Mission Integration

The Epiphany of the Lord

February 11th, 2014

Isaiah 60:1-6

Ephesians 3:2-3a, 5-6

Matthew 2: 1-12

 

When I was young, I remember being awe-struck by the stars in the night sky. While leaning back and watching the stars on a clear, crisp winter evening, I recall being captivated by one particular star that caught my eye. It appeared to shine brighter than the rest. I wondered, “Why is it so bright?” It shined as if it were calling to me.  I never figured out the answer but I still remained curious by the beautiful night sky and bright shining stars.

 

Since the earliest of times until today, many people have been fascinated with the stars. Stars have been studied, used as a guide for travelers, used to predict the future, used to honor people and acknowledge success. How fitting then, that a star guided the Magi to the place where Jesus was born so they could pay him homage, honor him and recognize Him as the King who would shepherd the people of Israel.

 

There are many ways to interpret this Sunday’s readings. I would like to share my thoughts briefly with the hope that we might reflect on what the message in this story might have for each of us in 2014.  The story of the Magi gives us a moment to reflect on what leads us to God today. We are surrounded by many stars (People,events) that guide us somewhere. Some stars attempt to lead us astray while others put on us on a direct path leading to God. In navigating the stars in the sky of our lives, have we found that one bright star that calls us into a real relationship with God?  A relationship in which love is unconditional, nonjudgmental, accepting of us as we truly are – created in the image of God. God is found in the most unexpected places.  We must trust in God and remain open so that we can recognize Him in the poorest of the poor, in the most difficult people, in the most trying situations, in the most simplest of moments. We may even find Him in the beauty that surrounds us such as the ice-covered trees.

 

As I do God’s work here at d’Youville, I find that I am continually transformed by my encounters with the sick and dying. I stand in awe as I witness the depth of their relationships with God. The people I meet are true examples/witnesses to God’s love. Many of them are my bright star that leads me into a richer, deeper relationship with God.   For me the message is fairly simple yet it can be elusive if we don’t pay attention every moment of our lives.

 

We are on a journey like the wise men. Through the grace of God, the wise men came to know Jesus and believe in Him. We too are relying on the grace of God to lead us to the light of Jesus so that we can come to know Him, love Him, and serve Him each and every day especially in the work we do here at St. Mary’s and d’Youville.

 

Let us remember what the refrain in the Christmas carol, “We Three Kings” says:

“O star of wonder, star of night,

Star with royal beauty bright,

Westward leading, still proceeding,

Guide us to thy perfect light.”

May your bright star lead you to the light of Christ and to a very personal relationship with Him.

 

Dan Doyon

Pastoral Care